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Singapore is a Meritocracy* [EXTRA LONG POST]

Singapore is a Meritocracy* [EXTRA LONG POST]
Edit: Thank you for all the comments and chat messages! I'm trying to go through each one. Writing thoughtful comments in the midst of having a full-time job is HARD WORK. I think I've missed a few questions, drop me a message if you're interested in continuing a discussion, I'm open to listening! There has been a lot of good comments, a few with great perspectives, and now I have a whole lot of things to read up on.
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Now that the 2020 General Election is firmly in our rear-view mirror, there is something that I have been meaning to write about: institutionalized racism affecting the minorities, especially the Malays, in Singapore. If you are groaning at this thinking you have been misled by this post’s title, I assure you that by the end of this post you will understand the caveat behind the above-mentioned title. I plead for a little of your time and patience.
We have seen many discussions online about majority privilege and systemic racism impacting the minorities. Many of you may have even participated in some of these discussions. I will not try to explain those terms for they have already been repeatedly debated to death. What this post aims to achieve is to bring to light Singapore’s history and government policies that have either benefited the majority race or kneecapped the minority race. Or both.
Why am I doing this?
It is frustrating to see some Singaporeans fully buying into the narrative that Singapore is a truly meritocratic society; that the government’s policies do not discriminate against minorities, or if a Singaporean worked hard enough he or she will succeed (whatever the definition of success is), or that we have anti-discriminatory laws that protect the minorities. Some even claim that the Malays enjoy special privileges due to Section 152 of the Constitution describing the special position of Malays, and that the Malays are blessed with free education in Singapore.
Section 152, “Special Position”, free education for all Malays?
Minorities and special position of Malays
152.—(1) It shall be the responsibility of the Government constantly to care for the interests of the racial and religious minorities in Singapore.
(2) The Government shall exercise its functions in such manner as to recognise the special position of the Malays, who are the indigenous people of Singapore, and accordingly it shall be the responsibility of the Government to protect, safeguard, support, foster and promote their political, educational, religious, economic, social and cultural interests and the Malay language.
The oft-mentioned Section 152 of the Constitution was an administrative continuation of previously existing colonial policy towards the Malays [Col: 126]. Regardless of the “special position” of the Malays, the only form of assistance rendered to the Malays was the policy of free education for all Malay students. This minimal approach of the government did little to improve the educational and socio-economic standing of the Malays as revealed by the 1980 national census. The free tertiary education policy was ultimately removed in 1990, despite opposition from Malays who questioned the constitutionality of its removal [col: 126].
With free education for all Malays, why haven’t their socio-economic and educational standings improved?
There are many factors to look at, and the issue goes way back to the colonial era so that’s where we shall start. The colonial administrators of Singapore, in their pursuit of capitalistic gains, had little use for the native inhabitants. The natives who were already living off their own land had no desire to work for the British as labourers. The British saw this unwillingness to work for them as indolence, and ascribed many other negative cultural stereotypes to the locals [pdf]. Nailing home the capitalistic intent of colonial presence in Singapore, the British Director of Education R. O. Winstedt explained their policy for education for the natives in 1920 [pg. 2]:
"The aim of the government is not to turn out a few well-educated youths, nor a number of less well-educated boys; rather it is to improve the bulk of the people, and to make the son of a fisherman or a peasant a more intelligent fisherman or peasant than his father had been, and a man whose education will enable him to understand how his lot in life fits in with the scheme of life around him".
And in 1915, a British resident revealed the colonial attitude towards education [pg. 3]:
"The great object of education is to train a man to make a living.... you can teach Malays so that they do not lose their skill and craft in fishing and jungle work. Teach them the dignity of manual labour, so that they do not all become krannies (clerks) and I am sure you will not have the trouble which has arisen in India through over education"
The type and quality of education that the British set up for the native inhabitants show that they had no intentions to empower the locals with skills for a new economy. The education provided, while free, was to make sure the locals were kept out of trouble for the British, and remain subservient to the colonial causes. Further impeding the socio-economic status of Malays, the British actively discouraged Malays in switching from agricultural production to more lucrative cash crops, preventing the building of wealth among the Malay communities (Shahruddin Ma’arof, 1988: 51). In contrast to the British suppression of the buildup of Malay wealth and provision of vernacular education, Chinese businessmen, clan associations and Christian missionaries established Chinese schools where students were taught skills like letter-writing and the use of the abacus. By the turn of the 20th century, the curriculum in these Chinese-language schools expanded to include arithmetic, science, history and geography while Malay-language schools under Winstedt’s educational policies focused on vernacular subjects such as basket-weaving.
So, when Singapore attained self-governance, did things get better?
Discontent with the education system and social inequalities was already a big issue in the mid 1950s that the parties that contested for the Legislative Assembly championed for reforms to social issues like better education systems, housing subsidies and workers rights.
The People’s Action Party (PAP) won the 1959 Legislative Assembly general elections by running on a rather progressive platform of low-cost housing, improvement of employment opportunities for locals and a stronger education. They also campaigned for abolishing the inequality of wealth in their election manifesto (Petir, 1958: 2), with PAP chairman Dr Toh Chin Chye expressing his disgust at seeing “so many of our people reduced to living like animals because under the present social and economic system, the good things of life are for the ruthless few, those who believe that the poor and the humble are despicable failures.”
With the PAP in power, assurances were made to Singaporeans that no community would be left behind. In 1965, Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew promised aid specifically to help raise the economic and education levels of the Malays. In 1967 during a mass rally at Geylang Serai, PM Lee again promised that “the Government with the support of the non-Malays are prepared to concentrate more than the average share of our resources on our Malay citizens [pdf].” He emphasized the importance of lifting all sections of the community to an even footing, reasoning that “if one section of the community were to lag behind it would harm the unity and integrity of the nation” (Bedlington, 1974: 289).
Despite these promises to help the minorities narrow the inequality gap, very little was done to realize it. Instead, the government took a ruthless approach towards economic growth, sparing no expense. Deputy Prime Minister Goh Keng Swee explained the government’s main concern was “to generate fast economic growth by any and every possible means. . . . If unequal distribution of income induced greater savings and investment . . . then this must be accepted as the price of fighting unemployment.” (Goh, 1972: 275)
By the late 1970s, a strong shift in parents’ preference towards an English-medium education for their children had resulted in a rapid decline in the number of vernacular schools.
Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, there was a shift of parents’ preference towards educating their child in the English stream. This shift, together with a period of minimal intervention in terms of educational policy and assistance to the minorities by the government, caused the number of enrolments in vernacular schools to rapidly decline. The socio-economic gap also widened between the Malays and Chinese, as the Chinese community enjoyed greater occupational mobility relative to the minorities. This can be seen in the shift in the lower manual occupation category, from a relatively equal proportion in 1957 to a 10 percent difference in 1980 [Table A]. In 1980, the average Malay household income was only 73.8 percent of the average Chinese household income. The income gap widened considerably by 1990, where the average Malay household income dropped to 69.8 percent of the average Chinese household income [Table B] (Rahim, 1998: 19-22). Decades after the lofty promises were made by the government, the Malay community’s slide into marginality continued.
Table A

Table B
Wait, the gap got bigger? Did the government do anything?
In 1979, Education Minister Dr Goh Keng Swee with the Education Study Team released a report on the Ministry of Education, more widely known as the Goh Report. The team was made up of 13 members, most of them systems analysts and economists, and none of whom ‘possess much knowledge or expertise on education’ (Goh Report, 1979: 1). The all-Chinese team excluded social scientists and educationalists, as the Education Minister had little regard for their expertise (Rahim, 1998: 121). The Goh Report made recommendations for radical changes to the educational system, recommendations which then became the basis of the New Education System (NES).
During a time when Tamil, Malay and Chinese schools were getting closed down due to declining enrolment numbers due to the popularity of English medium ones, the Special Assistance Plan (SAP) was introduced in 1978 to preserve and develop nine Chinese schools into bilingual (Mandarin and English) schools while retaining the values and traditions of a Chinese school. As part of the NES, these schools were to be the only ones to offer the Special course which the top 10 percent scorers of the PSLE are eligible to opt for. With these schools getting more resources, better facilities and the best teachers, the SAP contradicts the multi-racial principle of giving equal treatment to the non-English language streams. This exclusivity and the elite status of SAP schools affords its students better opportunities and advantages that are virtually out of reach for many minorities in Singapore. Effectively, the SAP is an institutionalized form of ethnic/cultural favouritism (Rahim, 1998: 130)
The NES also introduced early streaming for students which further exacerbated existing inequalities. Despite primary school education being free for all Singaporeans, families with better financial means have a huge advantage in preparing their child for streaming through additional tuition and better preschool choices#. (Barr & Low, 2005: 177) As we have seen from the disparity in household incomes between the Chinese and Malays, early streaming served to widen the gap between the haves and have-nots. The have-nots, more often than not, find themselves in the lower streams, trapped with very limited options providing upward social mobility. They will have to face an insurmountable task to lift themselves and their future generations out of their current predicament.
In 1982, the PAP slogan “a more just and equal society” was quietly dropped from the party’s constitution. This signaled an end to the socialist ideals that the party built its identity upon.
Why? It can’t be that the government favours one race over another...can it?
Examining the PAP leadership’s attitude towards the different cultures and ethnicities is key to understanding what the government values and how these values shaped its policies. Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew, as quoted in the Goh Report, extolled the values of East Asian philosophies: "The greatest value in the teaching and learning of Chinese is in the transmission of the norms of social or moral behaviour. This means principally Confucianist beliefs and ideas, of man [sic], society and the state" (Goh, 1979: v). The government’s championing of SAP schools and ‘Chinese values’ is also complemented by the launch of ‘Speak Mandarin Campaign’ in 1979.
In 1991, Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong espoused similar values as his predecessor, praising the virtues of ‘Confucian dynamism’ and claiming that Singapore would not be able to thrive and prosper without the Confucian core values of thrift, hard work and group cohesion. The fear of erosion of the Chinese cultural identity was never matched with a similar concern for the erosion of minority cultural identities, where the minorities were “expected to submit to a form of partial or incomplete assimilation into a Chinese-generated, Chinese-dominated society.#” (Barr & Low, 2005: 167)
On top of favouring Chinese cultural values and identities, the PAP leadership associated the cultures of the minorities with negative connotations. Speaking about a Malay who did well in business, Senior Minister Lee Kuan Yew described the man as “acting just like a Chinese. You know, he’s bouncing around, running around, to-ing and fro-ing. In the old culture, he would not be doing that” (Han, et al., 1998: 184). In a Straits Times article on 26 June 1992, SM Lee also implied that the Chinese are inherently better at Maths, and that "If you pretend that the problem does not exist, and that in fact (the Malays) can score as well as the Chinese in Maths, then you have created yourself an enormous myth which you will be stuck with.+"
These attitudes from the ruling elite translated into more policies that preserved the advantage of the majority. When faced with the “pressing national problem”* of a declining birth-rate of the Chinese, the government took steps to ensure Chinese numerical dominance in Singapore. The Singapore government encouraged the immigration of skilled workers from countries like Hong Kong, Korea, and Macau, countries which were accorded the status of ‘traditional sources’ of foreign labour (Rahim, 1998: 72). Meanwhile, showing the government’s preference and/or dislike for specific groups of people, Malaysian Malays faced great difficulty in getting work permits. (“‘Harder’ for bumiputras to get S’pore work permits.+”, The Straits Times, 7 Mar 1991)
Another policy which worked to preserve the advantage of the majority was the urban resettlement programmes of the 1960s and 1970s. This resulted in the dissolution of the Malay electoral strongholds in the east, undermining the organic growth of Malay political grassroots. When it became apparent in the 1980s that the Malays were moving back to the traditional Malay residential areas, an ethnic residential quota, labelled the Ethnic Integration Policy, was implemented. The rationale behind the quota was to ensure a balanced racial mix, purportedly for racial harmony. However, this rationale does not stand up to scrutiny in the face of numerous academic studies on interethnic urban attitudes and relations**. Another consequence of the policy is the reinforcement of racial segregation when taking into account the income disparity between the races. Underlining the weakness of the government’s reasoning, constituencies like Hougang were allowed to remain Chinese residential enclaves despite its population being approximately 80 percent Chinese. (Rahim, 1998: 73-77)
Perhaps the most controversial policy introduced was the Graduate Mothers Scheme. It was introduced in 1983 to reverse the trend of falling fertility rates of graduate women versus the rising birth-rate of non-graduate women***. In a push to encourage graduate mothers to get married and have children, Deputy Prime Minister Dr Goh Keng Swee unveiled a suite of incentives; all-expenses paid love-boat cruises for eligible graduate singles in the civil service, a computer dating service, fiscal incentives, and special admissions to National University of Singapore (NUS) to even out the male-female student ratio#. At the other end of the spectrum, lesser-educated women were encouraged to have smaller families in a scheme called the Small Family Incentive Scheme. This was achieved by paying out a housing grant worth S$10,000 to women who were able to meet the following set of conditions: be below 30 years of age, have two or less children, educational level not beyond secondary school, have a household income totalling not more than S$1,500 and willing to be sterilized#.
Based on the average household income statistics, a simple deduction could be made that those eligible for the sterilization programme were disproportionately from the minority communities.
Isn’t that eugenics?
Yes. Singapore had a government-established Eugenics Board.
The graduate mothers and sterilization programmes were greatly unpopular and were ultimately abandoned or modified after the PAP’s mandate took a 12.9 percent hit in the 1984 general election. However that did not mean that eugenics stopped being an influence in policy-making.
In his 1983 National Day address, PM Lee stated that when it comes to intelligence, “80 per cent is nature, or inherited, and 20 per cent the differences from different environments and upbringing.” This is telling of the role that eugenics, biological determinist and cultural deficit theories played in the formation of PAP policies.
To further safeguard Singapore from “genetic pollution” (Rahim, 1998: 55, Tremewan, 1994: 113), the Ministry of Labour in 1984 issued a marriage restriction between work permit holders and Singaporeans. The work permit holder would have his work permit cancelled, be deported and be permanently barred from re-entering Singapore if he were to marry a Singaporean or permanent resident without obtaining prior approval. Approval from the Commissioner for Employment would only be given if the work permit holder possesses skills and qualifications of value to Singapore.
Doesn’t sound to me like the government targets any particular race with its policies.
Deputy Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in 1987 rationalized that certain posts in the Singapore Armed Forces had been closed to Malays for "national security" reasons. He claimed that this policy was implemented to avoid placing Malays in an awkward position when loyalty to nation and religion came into conflict. PM Lee also added that the Malays behaved more as Malay Muslims than as loyal Singaporeans. PM Lee and DPM Lee’s statements finally made explicit what many suspected to have been an implicit rule. It could be observed that, despite being overrepresented in the civil service, Malays tend to stay in the lower-to-middle rungs of organizations like the SAF. It is also noteworthy that, to date, no Malay has held important Cabinet portfolios such as Minister of Defence, Minister of Home Affairs, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Minister of Trade and Industry.
The conflation of loyalty to the country with approval of the ruling party proved to be patently flawed, as studies by the Institute of Policy Studies (ST, 30 Sept 1990: 22; IPS, 2010) indicate that Singaporean Malays showed a stronger sense of national pride and identification compared to the other major ethnic groups. The study also found that Citizen-Nation Psychological Ties (CNP) scores, that is, national loyalty, weakens with: higher socio-economic status, Chinese, youth, and political alienation. Even when the Malays have been historically disenfranchised, they were found to be proud to be Singaporeans, loyal to Singapore and more willing to sacrifice for the nation than the other ethnic groups.
Additionally, Minister of Defence and Deputy Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong threatened to withhold aid to the Malay self-help organization Mendaki in 1988. The threat was issued over an incident during election night where several Malays in a crowd of Workers Party supporters had jeered at PM Goh at a vote counting centre. It became apparent from this incident that any aid offered by the government was tied to loyalty to the PAP instead of it being the duty of the government to serve Singaporeans regardless of party affiliation^^.
There have always been Malay PAP Members of Parliament (MP), did they not help fight for these issues?
The Malay PAP MPs are in the unique position of having to represent not only people of their constituents but also the rest of the Malay Singaporeans while toeing the party line. With many of the government policies being unhelpful towards the Malays, it is near impossible to fulfill this role satisfactorily. PAP MPs Ahmad Haleem (Telok Blangah) and Sha’ari Tadin (Kampong Chai Chee, Bedok) were both made to enjoy early retirements from their political careers for bringing up “sensitive” issues of the Malay community^^^. This set the tone for future PAP Malay MPs to remain unquestioningly in step with the leadership, regardless of their personal agreement, in order to have a long career within the party. Today, Malay PAP MPs have continued with the trend of parroting PAP policies that ran against the interests of the Malay/Muslim community (e.g. Environment and Water Resources Minister Masagos Zulkifli and Minister-in-charge of Muslim Affairs Yaacob Ibrahim with regards to the tudung issue).
What about the Mendaki and the Tertiary Tuition Fee Subsidy (TTFS)?
The policy providing free education for all Malays was ended in 1990 despite opposition from the Malays and the opposition party[Col: 126]. In its place, Mendaki introduced TTFS in 1991 to subsidise the cost of tertiary education in local institutions for those living in low household income. Due to the long history of marginalization and the widening of the inequality gap, the number of Malays who were able to make it to tertiary education institutions, especially in local universities, have been disproportionately low compared to the other ethnic groups. As such, the number of students able to benefit from this subsidy is even lower.
It was only recently, 20 years after the introduction of the subsidy, that the criteria for eligibility underwent revision. The revision takes into account the size of the family of the applicant, allowing for more Malay students to benefit from it. However, this subsidy is only one measure in an attempt to ensure that Malays students who were able to qualify for tertiary education are able to do so. Short of totally ditching streaming, more care, thought and resources are needed to lift the quality and accessibility of education for the Malays, especially in the early years of a child’s education.
So what needs to happen now?
Singaporeans, especially politicians, need to move on from making assertions similar to what PM Lee had made in 1987, that the "problem is psychological . . . if they try hard enough and long enough, then the education gap between them and the Chinese, or them and the Indians, would close. . . . Progress or achievement depends on ability and effort." It is important for Singaporeans to recognize the nearly Sisyphean task faced by marginalized communities in improving their socio-economic standing. Handicapped right from the start, their perceived failures in our “meritocratic” society should not be judged as an indictment of their efforts, but influenced in no small measure by the failings of the state in dragging their feet to take action. As a community, Singaporeans need to actively combat negative stereotyping, and move away from policies that were rooted in eugenics. Government intervention into ensuring unbiased, fair hiring practices would also help in raising the standing of the marginalized minorities. It would be impossible for Singapore to live up to its multiracial, meritocratic ideals without making fundamental changes to the above mentioned policies.
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# Academic journal behind a paywall. Most tertiary institutions should have partnerships with these journals, so you are likely able view them if you have a student email address.
+ Online scan of the article is unavailable
\* The declining birth-rate of the Chinese was one of three pressing national problems, according to PM Lee in a National Day rally speech in 1988; the others being education and the growing number of unmarried graduates [at approx 29 mins].
\* From Lily Zubaidah Rahim’s* The Singapore Dilemma (1998: 76-77): Rabushka’s (Rabushka, Alvin (1971), ‘Integration in Urban Malaya: Ethnic Attitudes Among Malays and Chinese’, 91-107) study found that it was common for people living in ethnically homogeneous areas to adopt favourable attitudes towards other ethnic groups. People who resided in ethnically mixed areas but did not mix with other ethnic groups were also found to hold negative attitudes towards others. He postulated that physical proximity coupled with superficial interaction across ethnic lines may in fact lead to heightened contempt for other ethnic groups. Urban studies (Fischer, Claude (1976), The Urban Experiment*) have similarly found that close physical distance of different ethnic groups does not necessarily result in narrowing the social distance between the communities. Indeed, physical ethnic proximity in large cities may well engender mutual revulsion and a heightening of ethnocentrism. These research findings have been corroborated by several Singaporean studies (Hassan, Riaz (1977),* ‘Families in Flats: A Study of Low Income Families in Public Housing’; Lai, Ah Eng (1995), ‘Meanings of Multiethnicity: A Case Study of Ethnicity and Ethnic Relations in Singapore’) which have found interethnic relations in the ethnically integrated public housing flats to be relatively superficial.
\** In the same article, PM Lee drew a straight line connecting the Malays with lower educational levels in this line of rhetoric questioning: “Why is the birth rate between the Malays, and the Chinese and Indians so different? Because the educational levels achieved are also different.”*
^ The stronger representation of Malays in civil service and Western multinational corporations was likely due to the difficulty in seeking employment in local firms. Prevalence of negative stereotyping of Malays meant that a Malay job applicant has to be much better qualified to be considered for a job in a local firm (Rahim, 1998: 25). A recent study into this phenomenon can be found here#.
^^ The PAP’s quid pro quo policy was put under the spotlight again in 2011, when PM Lee made it clear that the government’s neighbourhood upgrading programmes prioritised PAP wards over opposition wards.
^^^ PAP MP Ahmad Haleem raised the “sensitive” issue of the government’s exclusionary policy towards Malays in National Service, which adversely affected socio-economic standing of the Malay community [Col: 144]. PAP MP Sha’ari Tadin was actively involved in Malay community organizations and helped to organize a 1971 seminar on Malay participation in national development (Rahim, 1998: 90).
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Recommended Reading:
The Myth of the Lazy Native: A study of the image of the Malays, Filipinos and Javanese from the 16th to the 20th century and its function in the ideology of colonial capitalism [pdf].
The Singapore Dilemma: The Political and Educational Marginality of the Malay Community.
Eugenics on the rise: A report from Singapore#.
Assimilation as multiracialism: The case of Singapore’s Malay#.
Racism and the Pinkerton syndrome in Singapore: effects of race on hiring decisions#.
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References:
Bedlington, Stanley (1974), The Singapore Malay Community: The Politics of State Integration, Ph.D. thesis, Cornell University.
Chew, Peter K.H. (2008), Racism in Singapore: A Review and Recommendations for Future Research, James Cook University, Singapore.
Fook Kwang Han, Warren Fernandez, Sumiko Tan (1998) Lee Kuan Yew, the Man and His Ideas, Singapore Press Holding.
Goh, Keng Swee (1972), The Economics of Modernization and Other Essays, Singapore: Asia Pacific Press.
Michael D. Barr & Jevon Low (2005) Assimilation as multiracialism: The case of Singapore's Malays, Asian Ethnicity, 6:3, 161-182, DOI: 10.1080/14631360500226606
Rahim, Lily Z. (1998), The Singapore Dilemma: The political and educational marginality of the Malay community, Kuala Lumpur, Oxford University Press.
Shaharuddin Ma’aruf (1988), Malay Ideas on Development: From Feudal Lord to Capitalist, Times Book International, Singapore.
Tremewan, Christopher (1994), The Political Economy of Social Control in Singapore, London, Macmillan.
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Japanlife Coronavirus Megathread XIV: Health, Stimulus, Mail, and Border Questions Edition


Japan COVID-19 Tracker City level tracker Tokyo Metro. Gov. Tracker Tokyo tracker
Past Megathreads: I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII XIII
As COVID-19 is not abating, the threads will continue until active infections improve. Many many many thanks to zchew for tirelessly posting the first 13 threads of this series!
What you can do:
  1. Avoid travel to affected countries. You will still not be able to return.
  2. Wear masks when you go out. Avoid crowds.
  3. Wash hands (with SOAP) frequently and observe strict hygiene regimen. Avoid touching your face and minimise touching random things (like door handles, train grab holds). Avoid hand-dryers.
  4. If you show symptoms (cough, fever, shortness of breath and/or difficulty breathing) or suspect that you have contracted the virus, please call the coronavirus soudan hotline or your local hokenjo(保健所) here. They will advise you on what to do. Do not show up at a hospital or clinic unannounced, call ahead to let them know.
  5. Avoid spreading misinformation about the virus on social media.
News updates
Date Article
07/29 Entry Restrictions Easing for those with Status of Residence
07/22 794 Daily Cases, Highest Recorded To Date
07/19 AKB48's Kayoko Takita contracts Coronavirus
07/11 Japan to grant re-entry to some foreign residents
07/10 Japan looks to ease travel ban on China, South Korea and others in Asia
06/30 Resumption and temporary suspension of acceptance, delivery delays of mail items destined to various countries/territories
06/12 MoJ publishes examples of cases of exceptional circumstances for foreign residents (Japanese)
06/11 Japan to let in 250 foreigners per day from Australia, NZ, Thailand, Vietnam under eased travel curbs
06/04 JPost update on international mail (Japanese)
05/25 State of Emergency to be lifted nationwide
05/22 Government to consider letting foreign residents who are stuck overseas back into Japan
05/12 3 month extension granted for renewal of visas expiring in July.
05/02 Special Cash Payments Online Application has been officially released by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications
04/04 WHO opens door to broader use of masks to limit spread of coronavirus
04/03 All foreigners(incl. PRs) will be denied entry if they have travel history to affected areas, MOJ See PDF for details
03/24 Olympic postponement of 1 year confirmed

ENTRY BAN RELATED INFORMATION:
Q&Afrom MHLW
japan.travel Travel restrictions info
(1) Bans on foreign Travelers Entering Japan if they have visited these places in last 14 days:
Continent Area (effective July 1st)
Asia Bangladesh, Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Viet Nam
Oceania Australia, New Zealand
North America Canada, United States of America
Latin America and the Caribbean Argentine, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Saint Christopher and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Uruguay
Europe Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyz, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican
Middle East Afghanistan, Bahrain, Israel, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates
Africa Algeria, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central Africa, Cote d’lvoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eswatini, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa
(2) Foreigners who have Chinese passports issued in Hubei Province or Zhejiang Province of China
(3) Foreigners who were on the cruise ship Westerdam, departed from Hong Kong
Information on travel restrictions for travelers from Japan (Japanese)

FAQ:
Can someone clarify whether these entry bans apply to permanent resident card holders?
Foreign language hotline for coronavirus soudan centre
Regarding how to get tested:
You can't get tested on demand. You will likely only be tested if you had direct contact with a known patient, have travel history to a hotspot, or are exhibiting severe symptoms. Only a doctor or coronavirus soudan centre has the discretion to decide if you are to be tested. **Testing criteria seems to be changing.
Consumer-driven tests:
  1. Costco has starting offering tests for ¥ in Kyoto - this is an antibody test to see if you have gotten Coronavirus (and developed antibodies to it), not a PCR test to see if you have it now in your blood - https://www.reddit.com/japanlife/comments/huc7wi/japanlife_coronavirus_megathread_xiv_health/fynlahc/?context=3
Useful links:
List of online grocers Is 100k stimulus taxable? (Japan / US) MHLW coronavirus aggregated info page
List of English-speaking mental health resources Why your package isn't arriving from USA / reaching USA MOJ data on foreigners with "exceptional circumstances"
regarding re-entry (1) (2) (3) Social welfare assistance for foreigners & Navigating Unemployment Assistance Non-permanent resident could return to Japan, family medical emergency

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Reducing your buying of Chinese products in New Zealand

Some information for those wanting to reduce their buying of Chinese made products and limit their financial contribution to the CCP who routinely commit human rights abuses such as torture, forced disappearances, extrajudicial killings, ethnic cleansing, promote and perpetrate racial discrimination, organ harvesting, suppression of freedom of speech and religious and sexual orientation based persecution.
The effectiveness of boycotts is debatable and many people will often comment stating it's pointless and throw out their best gotchas but at the end of the day if supporting a government like the CCP financially doesn't sit right with you and you get frustrated by seeing your government constrained in it's actions by economic reasons then you can look at where you can reduce your consumerism of products that benefit the CCP, also realise corporate and consumer greed in New Zealand and other countries has caused this dangerous over reliance we now face.
It's certainly not pointless and stopping Chinese dependency isn't an overnight process but reducing your own purchase of Chinese products is a good place to start.
Outside of electronics and pharmaceuticals the difficulty of purchasing non Chinese made products in New Zealand is often overstated and quite easily achievable in most cases.
The extent to which you do this is up to you. You may look at a changing the way you live significantly and reduce your consumerism overall, buying more second-hand, getting into DIY and 3D printing or may just look at alternative sources for products where and when it's viable to you.
Buying used Chinese products is still ensuring Chinese products retain resale value but still better than buying new. You may not want to support some of the alternative source countries either whether it's the US, India, Israel or Vietnam for example where China owns a lot of factories so they can label the origin as Vietnam and also dodge tariffs by rerouting goods using transshipment methods. It's up to you to do research and find a product you're comfortable buying from as all major manufacturing countries have issues regarding human rights and ethics.
It's not only about avoiding Chinese products and as a member of the public you can influence NZ businesses to move production out of China or source products from elsewhere. Let stores know you don't want to purchase Chinese made products and offer alternatives you're interested in, they will take into consideration customer demand.
Email politicians and express your concerns and need for divestment from China, these people often need motivation to actually do something and create effective policies that will reduce dependency.
Given the current state of the world now it's possibly the best time to start reducing buying Chinese products if you haven't already with trade issues between China, US, Australia, India, Japan and Korea ongoing. Rising manufacturing costs, regulations and an increasingly unstable geopolitical situation are forcing more manufacturers to move production elsewhere and many have began in the last few years as they wean themselves off the Chinese manufacturing that has shaped the global economy for the past 30 years. Hyundai Steel and several other South Korean major businesses are planning to shut Chinese factories and move to elsewhere such as India along with waves of other companies.
Last year Australian companies stopped importing cotton sourced from the Chinese province of Xinjiang after reports of human rights abuse in forced labor camps came to light and a recent survey showed 88% of Australians want to boycott Chinese products.
India and Tibet have called for a joint campaign to boycott Chinese goods in response to border intrusion incidents perpetrated by China. Calls to boycott Chinese products have been common for some time in the Philippines, Tibetan and Vietnam and many people in the UK are urging the government to also ban the import of all cotton made by forced labour in Xinjiang. Even many mainland Chinese are calling for boycotts of Chinese made products.
Boycotts are nothing new and often unsuccessful due to being a short lived trend and dissipated within months as economics quickly dissolve any binds perpetuated by ethics and isolationism. China boycotted all Japanese products in the 1930's and still regularly boycott countries products, the US tried to boycott French goods in 2003 and Arab nations have also tried boycotting Israeli and American products.
In the past it's been argued the importance of maintaining close exchanges and high trade levels to be in a better position to resolve issues through dialogue and consultation, this has also failed in China's case and they continue to ramp up their global expansion while committing ethnic genocide, IP theft, suppression of free speech and many other atrocities regularly.
New Zealand expanding our own manufacturing industry to a degree to where a significant amount of products will be made locally is unrealistic but purchasing local where possible and from countries with more ethical governments drives innovation and expansion upon demand.
Below are some examples of alternative products many which are stocked in New Zealand and others available to order online. I've tried to make sure everything up to date but with companies constantly changing manufacturing processes and issues with transparency there may be some discrepancies, feel free to correct anything and I'll edit.
Many of these products may still include Chinese components but it's about minimizing not perfection. For example Samsung has no direct manufacturing plants left in China but given around 80% of global supply of rare metals used in phones is from China some components in Samsung phones are still made in China, the majority is not for many of their products.
These are just some of the many alternative brands available to give you an idea of options, check with the supplier before purchasing to confirm country origin.
In regards to computer parts, non Chinese made CPU, memory, and SSD are easy to find in NZ and many of the ones available are made in Taiwan, Singapore, Germany and the US. Cases, motherboards, fans, graphics cards and power supplies are more difficult but again reducing and buying a product with Chinese made components is better than buying a product fully manufactured in China. Intel, PNY, Patriot all manufactured in the US. EIZO from Japan make great monitors. ASUS, ASROCK, ACER and Gigabyte are made in Taiwan mostly although ASUS does produce some products in China. Western Digital are mostly made in Malaysia. Kingston, ADATA and Samsung flash drives and hard drives are mostly made in Taiwan and Mediasonic in Japan.
A lot of Epson printers are made in Indonesia or Philippines and many Canon printers are made in Korea, Thailand and Japan.
For cameras Fuji is usually made in Japan, Hasselblad in Sweden, Leica from Germany and Portugal, Alpa made in Switzerland and Arri from Germany. Canon stuff is made mostly in Taiwan and Malaysia and Profoto lights are made in Sweden. Lots of high end Nikon are still made in Japan, most mid to high end lenses too.
Sony make many of their headphones in Malaysia now, some of Samsungs range are made in Vietnam, Beyerdynamic are great headphones from Germany, Klipsch, Ultrasone make some in Germany and Taiwan but also some in China. There's also Dali made in Denmark and Fostex made in Japan.
Garmin has many NZ stockists and are manufactured in Taiwan and the US I believe, great smartwatches and other wrist worn devices.
China produces an around 40 billion ballpoint pens annually but there's also options like Pentel from Japan and Rotring made in Japan and Germany available in NZ if you purchase office supplies.
For gardening tools there's Garant Botanica from Canada, Berger, Bahcoand Sneeboer all from Europe and non Chinese gardening tools can be found easily in NZ.
Coffee machines, there's Nespresso usually made in Ukraine and Switzerland, AeroPress made in the US, QuickMill and Bialetti from Italy and Thailand and all these brands are available in New Zealand.
For power tools there's Bosch which are often made in Hungary, Poland, Germany and Switzerland but still some made in China. Dremel from Mexico and Swisstools from Switzerland. Kress, Festool and Metabo are made mostly in Germany. Some of these are widely available in New Zealand and some aren't, request them from hardware stores you use and they'll stock more when aware of demand.
Non Chinese made phones can be difficult to source in New Zealand but there are options. Some to look out for would be the LG G8X ThinQ, LG Stylo 5 and Samsung Galaxy Note 10 from South Korea, Librem 5, Pixel 4a, ASUS ROG made in Taiwan, Iphone SE2, Samsung Galaxy M31, Samsung M21, Fairphone 3, some Sony Xperia are made in Japan and Moto G Stylus mostly made in India. Again, these mostly contain some level of components made in China and the origins of international versions can vary so check with suppliers before purchasing.
Oster, Wahl and Panasonic have some hair clippers not made in China and are easy enough to find from NZ stores.
BlackVue and Thinkware dashcam cameras are designed and made in South Korea and Transcend are made in Taiwan.
As for sunglasses some good brands to look at are Derapage, Salt from Japan, Zeiss germany, Maui Jim is designed in the US and manufactured in Italy and Japan.
Blendtec, Beurer and KitchenAid are good options for appliances although some KitchenAid are made in China. Zojirushi from Japan are not cheap but great quality and products, not widely available in NZ but I've seen them at a few stores and online NZ retailers.
A lot of Samsung TV's are made in Thailand and Malaysia, LG do some in China but also Poland. Check with the NZ store you're buying from before purchasing.
In terms of food I find it reasonably easy to find alternatives although Chinese produces for 62% of world’s ginger exports and 80% of the imported garlic worldwide comes from China. Thai, Brazilian and Peruvian ginger is available and of better quality with similar prices. Countdown stock some minced Brazilian garlic but the Healthy N Fresh brand at Pak N Save is a product of the PRC.
For PPE there's 3M (N95 - Model 8210, Nexcare series only), Banale, Banitore, Comfort, Cross Protection, Crosstex, CSD, Halyard, Haofa, Kowa, Tricare, UdiLife and Mocacare and many more. Not widely stocked in NZ stores but available online.
Also if you're a twitter user you can search for the hashtag 'abc_challenge' which is a good resource to find non Chinese made products.
This is a just an example of some of the products available to you that are not Chinese made or have minimal components, a lot of them available in New Zealand or for online order and will become more readily available in NZ stores with customer demand. You can do research and make informed choices and share that information with friends and family, in some cases you may want not want to pay higher prices along with shipping and decide to go with a Chinese made product which is up to you personally but there are options.
submitted by Temporary_Golf to newzealand [link] [comments]

Japanlife Coronavirus Megathread THE FINAL: Stimulus, Mail, and Border Questions Edition


Japan COVID-19 Tracker City level tracker Tokyo Metro. Gov. Tracker Tokyo tracker
Past Megathreads: I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII
The coronavirus situation in Japan seems to be stabilising somewhat and as it becomes the new normal, I don`t think that this is required for much longer and I`m sure people would like to have the the sticky space freed up for the usual weekly threads. The mods are in agreement, so I think this will be the last thread.
What you can do:
  1. Avoid travel to affected countries. You will still not be able to return.
  2. Wear masks when you go out. Avoid crowds.
  3. Wash hands (with SOAP) frequently and observe strict hygiene regimen. Avoid touching your face and minimise touching random things (like door handles, train grab holds). Avoid hand-dryers.
  4. If you show symptoms (cough, fever, shortness of breath and/or difficulty breathing) or suspect that you have contracted the virus, please call the coronavirus soudan hotline or your local hokenjo(保健所) here. They will advise you on what to do. Do not show up at a hospital or clinic unannounced, call ahead to let them know.
  5. Avoid spreading misinformation about the virus on social media.
News updates
Date
07/11 Japan to grant re-entry to some foreign residents
07/10 Japan looks to ease travel ban on China, South Korea and others in Asia
06/30 Resumption and temporary suspension of acceptance, delivery delays of mail items destined to various countries/territories
06/12 MoJ publishes examples of cases of exceptional circumstances for foreign residents (Japanese)
06/11 Japan to let in 250 foreigners per day from Australia, NZ, Thailand, Vietnam under eased travel curbs
06/04 JPost update on international mail (Japanese)
05/25 State of Emergency to be lifted nationwide
05/22 Government to consider letting foreign residents who are stuck overseas back into Japan
05/12 3 month extension granted for renewal of visas expiring in July.
05/02 Special Cash Payments Online Application has been officially released by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications
04/04 WHO opens door to broader use of masks to limit spread of coronavirus
04/03 All foreigners(incl. PRs) will be denied entry if they have travel history to affected areas, MOJ See PDF for details
03/24 Olympic postponement of 1 year confirmed

ENTRY BAN RELATED INFORMATION:
Q&Afrom MHLW
japan.travel Travel restrictions info
(1) Bans on foreign Travelers Entering Japan if they have visited these places in last 14 days:
Continent Area (effective July 1st)
Asia Bangladesh, Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Viet Nam
Oceania Australia, New Zealand
North America Canada, United States of America
Latin America and the Caribbean Argentine, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Saint Christopher and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Uruguay
Europe Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyz, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican
Middle East Afghanistan, Bahrain, Israel, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates
Africa Algeria, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central Africa, Cote d’lvoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eswatini, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa
(2) Foreigners who have Chinese passports issued in Hubei Province or Zhejiang Province of China
(3) Foreigners who were on the cruise ship Westerdam, departed from Hong Kong
Information on travel restrictions for travelers from Japan (Japanese)

FAQ:
Can someone clarify whether these entry bans apply to permanent resident card holders?
Foreign language hotline for coronavirus soudan centre
Regarding how to get tested:
You can't get tested on demand. You will likely only be tested if you had direct contact with a known patient, have travel history to a hotspot, or are exhibiting severe symptoms. Only a doctor or coronavirus soudan centre has the discretion to decide if you are to be tested. **Testing criteria seems to be changing.
Useful links:
List of online grocers Is 100k stimulus taxable? (Japan / US) MHLW coronavirus aggregated info page
List of English-speaking mental health resources Why your package isn't arriving from USA / reaching USA MOJ data on foreigners with "exceptional circumstances"
regarding re-entry (1) (2) (3) Social welfare assistance for foreigners Non-permanent resident could return to Japan, family medical emergency

submitted by zchew to japanlife [link] [comments]

Your Pre Market Brief for 07/16/2020

Pre Market Brief for Thursday July 16th 2020

You can subscribe to the daily 4:00 AM Pre Market Brief on The Twitter Link Here . Alerts in the tweets will direct you to the daily 4:00 AM Pre Market Brief in this sub.
Updated as of 4:45 AM EST
-----------------------------------------------
Stock Futures:
Wednesday 07/15/2020 News and Markets Recap:
Thursday July 16th 2020 Economic Calendar (All times are in EST)
(JOBLESS CLAIMS TODAY)
News Heading into Thursday July 16th 2020:
NOTE: I USUALLY (TRY TO) POST MANY OF THE MOST PROMISING, DRAMATIC, OR BAD NEWS OVERNIGHT STORIES THAT ARE LIKELY IMPORTANT TO THE MEMBERS OF THIS SUB AT THE TOP OF THIS LIST. PLEASE DO NOT YOLO THE VARIOUS TICKERS WITHOUT DOING RESEARCH! THE TIME STAMPS ON THESE MAY BE LATER THAN OTHERS ON THE WEB.
Upcoming Earnings:
Commodities:
COVID-19 Stats and News:
Macro Considerations:
Most Recent SEC Filings
Other
-----------------------------------------------
Morning Research and Trading Prep Tool Kit
Other Useful Resources:
The Ultimate Quick Resource For the Amateur Trader.
Subscribe to This Brief and the daily 4:00 AM Pre Market Brief on The Twitter Link Here . Alerts in the tweets will direct you to the daily brief in this sub
submitted by Cicero1982 to pennystocks [link] [comments]

Japanlife Coronavirus Megathread XII: SoE lifting, Stimulus and International Mail Edition


Japan COVID-19 Tracker City level tracker Tokyo Metro. Gov. Tracker Tokyo tracker
Coronavirus Megathread I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI
The main body will be updated with mainly news and advisory from embassies. The thread will be re-created once it goes past roughly 1k comments or on moderators' request.
What you can do:
  1. Avoid travel to affected countries. You will still not be able to return.
  2. Wear masks when you go out. Avoid crowds.
  3. Wash hands (with SOAP) frequently and observe strict hygiene regimen. Avoid touching your face and minimise touching random things (like door handles, train grab holds). Avoid hand-dryers.
  4. If you show symptoms (cough, fever, shortness of breath and/or difficulty breathing) or suspect that you have contracted the virus, please call the coronavirus soudan hotline or your local hokenjo(保健所) here. They will advise you on what to do. Do not show up at a hospital or clinic unannounced, call ahead to let them know.
  5. Avoid spreading misinformation about the virus on social media.
News updates
Date
06/18 Resumption and temporary suspension of acceptance, delivery delays of mail items destined to various countries/territories
06/12 MoJ publishes examples of cases of exceptional circumstances for foreign residents (Japanese)
06/11 Japan to let in 250 foreigners per day from Australia, NZ, Thailand, Vietnam under eased travel curbs
06/04 JPost update on international mail (Japanese)
05/25 State of Emergency to be lifted nationwide
05/22 Government to consider letting foreign residents who are stuck overseas back into Japan
05/12 3 month extension granted for renewal of visas expiring in July.
05/02 Special Cash Payments Online Application has been officially released by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications
04/04 WHO opens door to broader use of masks to limit spread of coronavirus
04/03 All foreigners(incl. PRs) will be denied entry if they have travel history to affected areas, MOJ See PDF for details
03/24 Olympic postponement of 1 year confirmed

ENTRY BAN RELATED INFORMATION:
Q&Afrom MHLW
japan.travel Travel restrictions info
(1) Bans on foreign Travelers Entering Japan if they have visited these places in last 14 days:
Continent Area
Asia Bangladesh, Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Viet Nam
Oceania Australia, New Zealand
North America Canada, United States of America
Latin America and the Caribbean Argentina, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Saint Christopher and Nevis, Uruguay
Europe Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyz, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican
Middle East Afghanistan, Bahrain, Israel, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates
Africa Cabo Verde, Cote d’lvoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritius, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa
(2) Foreigners who have Chinese passports issued in Hubei Province or Zhejiang Province of China
(3) Foreigners who were on the cruise ship Westerdam, departed from Hong Kong
Information on travel restrictions for travelers from Japan (Japanese)

FAQ:
Can someone clarify whether these entry bans apply to permanent resident card holders?
Foreign language hotline for coronavirus soudan centre
Regarding how to get tested:
You can't get tested on demand. You will likely only be tested if you had direct contact with a known patient, have travel history to a hotspot, or are exhibiting severe symptoms. Only a doctor or coronavirus soudan centre has the discretion to decide if you are to be tested. **Testing criteria seems to be changing.
Useful links:
List of online grocers Is 100k stimulus taxable? (Japan / US) MHLW coronavirus aggregated info page
List of English-speaking mental health resources Why your package isn't arriving from USA / reaching USA MOJ data on foreigners with "exceptional circumstances"
regarding re-entry (1) (2) Social welfare assistance for foreigners

submitted by zchew to japanlife [link] [comments]

[GE 2020] Compiled TV / Broadcast Schedule

I haven't seen this posted on the sub, so here's a compiled list of broadcasts this cycle, and where they have been discussed. I'll update it as time goes on with more details.
If there is anything you feel is biased toward any party, or is missed out, please comment in this thread, thanks!
Date / Time Title Where to Watch (Recordings in bold) Discussion Thread
30 June / 11am Nomination Day CNA YouTube Here
1 July / 8pm Political Debate (English) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
1 July / 9pm Political Debate (Mandarin) Ch 8 Same as English
2 July / 6:30pm Lianhe Zaobao Debate (Mandarin) Zaobao YouTube Here
2 July / 8pm Party Political Broadcast (English) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
2 July / 8pm Party Political Broadcast (Mandarin) Ch 8 Same as English
2 July / 8:30pm Party Political Broadcast (Malay) Suria Same as English
2 July / 9pm Party Political Broadcast (Tamil) Vasantham Same as English
3 July / 7pm NUSS Pre-Election Forum NUSS YouTube Here
3 July / 7pm Constituency Political Broadcasts (Aljunied GRC, Ang Mo Kio GRC, Bishan-Toa Payoh GRC, Bukit Batok SMC, Bukit Panjang SMC) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
4 July / 7pm Constituency Political Broadcasts (Chua Chu Kang GRC, East Coast GRC, Holland-Bukit Timah GRC, Hong Kah North SMC, Hougang SMC) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
5 July / 7pm Constituency Political Broadcasts (Jalan Besar GRC, Jurong GRC, Kebun Baru SMC, MacPherson SMC, Marine Parade GRC) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
6 July / 7pm Constituency Political Broadcasts (Marsiling-Yew Tee GRC, Marymount SMC, Mountbatten SMC, Nee Soon GRC, Pasir Ris-Punggol GRC) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
7 July / 7pm Constituency Political Broadcasts (Pioneer SMC, Potong Pasir SMC, Punggol West SMC, Radin Mas SMC, Sembawang GRC, Sengkang GRC) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
8 July / 7pm Constituency Political Broadcasts (Tampines GRC, Tanjong Pagar GRC, West Coast GRC, Yio Chu Kang SMC, Yuhua SMC) CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
9 July / 8pm Party Political Broadcast 2 CNA YouTube / Ch 5 Here
10 July / 8pm Election Results CNA YouTube / All Local Channels Here
* Constituency Political Broadcast schedule is a prediction by the author
Party Online Broadcast/Rally Schedules
* Schedules might change daily and other events might be occurring, please refer to the individual parties' Facebook pages for more information.
Party When Where Discussion / Watch
PAP Daily, Straight Talk @ 12:30pm, 4:30pm, 8pm PAP Facebook 1 July Women: Pushing Boundaries
2 July Global Economy
6 July @ 12pm PAP YouTube / Facebook
PSP Daily, GE Roundup @ 9:30pm PSP Facebook
WP Daily, Hammer Show @ 8pm WP Facebook 1 July Discussion / Link
3 July Discussion / Link
SDP Daily(?) @ 7:30pm SDP Facebook 30 June Discussion / Link
PV Daily, Lim Tean After Work @ 5pm PV Facebook
RP 2 July @ 8pm / 3 July @ 9pm RP Facebook
NSP Unknown NSP Facebook
SPP Unknown SPP Facebook
SDA Unknown SDA Facebook
PPP Unknown PPP Facebook
RDU Unknown RDU Facebook
Useful Links:
Sources:
submitted by KeythKatz to singapore [link] [comments]

AMA: 20 Things I Wish I Knew Before Going to an Elite College

Hey there! I graduated from a mid-ranked Ivy a few years ago. Below is a list of 20 things I wish I knew before going to an elite college. This advice applies to anyone attending an elite college or university (eg. Michigan, Colby, WashU, Georgetown, MIT, Claremont McKenna, Amherst, Brown, ect.) next year.
First, a little bit about myself. I had a decent college experience that was amazing in many ways and less good in others. After graduation, I moved to DC and worked in politics for a couple years. This fall, I applied to law school, and I’ve been accepted to a number of good programs. I’m currently deciding among UChicago, Columbia, and NYU.
I'm also happy to answer questions as well, so feel free to ask away (after glancing through the questions I've already answered). Without further ado, here is the list!
  1. It doesn’t matter which elite college or university you go to.
A lot of people agonize over the fact that they didn’t get into Harvard and have to settle for Cornell, or that they didn’t get into MIT and have to go to Carnegie Mellon. Honestly, the truth is that where you go to school doesn’t matter so long as you go to an elite college or university. Today, the great news is that there are so many elite colleges and universities that provide the same quality education and similar professional and graduate school opportunities (see list of colleges and universities above).
For example, if one person goes to Colgate, another person goes to Harvard, and both people major in economics and apply to PhD programs in economics after they graduate, they’ll both have similar odds at getting into elite PhD programs assuming their GPAs, research experience, and faculty recommendations are similar. If the Colgate guy has better grades, better research experience, and better faculty recommendations, he’ll get accepted to a better economics PhD program than the Harvard guy.
The same is true for other grad schools (eg. law, medicine, business, ect.) and jobs (eg. Facebook, Goldman Sachs, McKinsey). So long as you go to an elite college or university, you’ll have largely the same opportunities as someone else who went to a slightly higher ranked elite college or university.
Additionally, people (who matter, such as employers and grad schools) largely view elite college grads from all elite schools as equally smart regardless of the elite school they attended. For example, when I meet someone from Princeton and someone from UVA, I’m not automatically more impressed with the Princeton guy, and I don’t automatically think the Princeton guy is smarter than the UVA guy. Instead, there’s more of an elite college/non-elite college dichotomy in my mind and in the minds of most elite college alumni and most employers. In other words, if I meet someone who went to WVU and someone who went to UVA, Princeton, Pomona, or Emory, I automatically DO think the non-elite college WVU guy is dumber than the elite college guy from any elite school (sorry, but it’s the truth!). However, I don’t really distinguish among the elite college guys based on the schools they attended. Instead, I distinguish them based on their intellect, personality, and professional success.
  1. All of the students at one highly ranked elite school aren’t necessarily smarter than all of the students at another slightly lower ranked elite school.
Yup, this is definitely true. Just because your high school classmate’s going to Harvard and you’re going to Cornell doesn’t mean that one year from now, two years from now, three years from now, or four years from now your high school classmate will be “smarter” than you. During college everyone grows intellectually and some grow more than others regardless of which school they attend. This means that you could graduate from Cornell with a 3.8 GPA while your high school buddy at Harvard might not adapt too well to college and might only pull a 3.4. Guess who’s “smarter” and has better professional and grad school opportunities when you graduate college? You, the Cornell guy! The same is true even if you attended Colby or UVA while your high school classmate went to Harvard.
  1. Higher ranked elite colleges aren’t necessarily more difficult academically than lower ranked elite colleges.
Yup, this one’s also true. Just because Harvard’s acceptance rate is twice as low as Amherst’s acceptance rate doesn’t make Harvard students twice as smart as Amherst students or Harvard classes twice as hard as Amherst classes. Honestly, the students at both schools are likely equally smart and the classes are probably about the same in terms of academic rigor.
That being said, there are some schools that are known for grade deflation, such as Columbia, UChicago, and Princeton. These schools are likely more academically rigorous than places like Dartmouth or Harvard, but their academic rigor stems less from their ranking and selectivity and more from their administrative policies and academic traditions that reinforce grade deflation.
  1. Even if you didn’t get admitted to an elite college or university, your life is not over.
Even if you didn’t do so well in high school grade-wise or got unlucky in college admissions, don’t panic. Your life is not over. You can still get into a top-notch grad school and/or get a top notch job and have phenomenal opportunities for the rest of your life.
I know many people who have done this. One of my professors at my Ivy league school who has a Wikipedia page (yup, he’s that famous in his field!) went to a bad California public college for undergrad and ended up getting a PhD from and a professorship at an Ivy League school. Similarly, one kid from my high school did really poorly academically in high school, got his s*** together at a tiny, no-name liberal arts college, and now attends Stanford Law School. Heck, I didn’t even get admitted to Stanford Law when I applied this fall while he did! It just comes to show that you can’t rest on your laurels if you do get into an Ivy League undergrad school, and you can’t be down on yourself if you don’t.
Suffice to say that if you’re dying to get that elite college or Ivy League degree, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to do so after undergrad. Most Ivies have great grad schools that you can attend later on in life. Or, to really spice things up, go abroad to Oxford, Cambridge, or LSE and get that one year British master degree immediately following college graduation! Tons of Americans do this.
  1. If you have multiple acceptances from elite colleges, pick the elite college where you feel you would fit in best.
Deposit day is right around the corner for most schools, and if you’re still agonizing over which elite college to choose, here’s a simple pro tip: pick the elite college where you’ll be happiest. For example, if you were admitted to Cornell and Georgetown and you believe that you would be happier at Georgetown compared to Cornell but are worried that “Georgetown isn’t an Ivy!”, go to Georgetown. Both schools are close enough in prestige that it doesn’t really matter which one you choose. Because you believe you’ll fit in better at Georgetown, you’ll be happier there, make more friends there, and get better grades there, which will create more future opportunities for you than you would have gotten had you chased the Ivy League label and gone to Cornell instead.
I say this from personal experience. While I enjoyed my college in many ways and would still recommend it to many potential students, I believe that I would have been happier at Williams or Amherst, and I would have gotten the same exact opportunities at both schools that I got at my school.
That being said, if you are admitted to a non-elite school (eg. OSU, UF, Ole Miss, ect.) and an elite school, if finances/student loans aren’t an issue, definitely choose the elite school over the non-elite school. I have nothing against non-elite schools, but the truth is that you will not get the same opportunities at these schools that you will at elite colleges. For this reason, if finances aren’t an issue, always pick the elite school.
  1. If you have multiple acceptances from elite colleges, pick the elite college that aligns best with your future goals.
If you’re still having trouble choosing which elite college to attend, consider which one will most align with your future goals. For example, if you were admitted to Dartmouth and Rice, and you are dead-set on living in Houston for the rest of your life, go to Rice. Why? Because a much larger proportion of your potential college friends from Rice will settle in Houston after college, and you’ll have a much larger network of friends in your city, which will make life more enjoyable and help you advance in whichever career you choose.
If you want to live abroad, make sure you choose a school that has a stronger international brand reputation. For example, if you’re choosing between Williams and Georgetown, and you’re 100% sure that you want to live abroad for a significant portion of your life, you should probably choose Georgetown (unless you absolutely hate it) because far more people abroad will know Georgetown than Williams.
In general, a plurality of graduates from each elite school tend to cluster in one or two cities. For Dartmouth and all the New England Ivies/Little Ivies, it’s Boston and NYC (and SF to a lesser extent). For Penn, it’s Philly and NYC (and SF to a lesser extent). For Princeton and Columbia, it’s NYC (and SF to a lesser extent). For UVA and Georgetown, it’s DC (and NYC to a lesser extent). For Berkeley and Stanford, it’s SF and LA (and NYC to a lesser extent). For Northwestern, UChicago, Notre Dame, and WashU, it’s Chicago (and NYC to a lesser extent). For Duke and Emory, it’s Atlanta (and DC/NYC to a lesser extent).
Does this mean that there are no elite college alums from your elite college in non-feeder cities? No! Of course there are alums in these cities, and these cities will likely have alumni clubs that you can join. However, chances are that the majority of your future friends at whichever elite school you attend will likely follow the crowd to the feeder city(ies) that most alums from your school go to after graduation. Definitely keep this in mind as you choose which college to attend.
Internationally, most larger American elite schools (eg. non liberal arts colleges) will have solid alumni networks and alumni clubs in London and Hong Kong. Other cities, such as Beijing, Shanghai, Singapore, Paris, Berlin, and Dubai may have alumni, but there might not be a large, active alumni club, so if you want to live in these locations, it’s definitely a good idea to choose a university with more name recognition internationally (eg. Berkeley over Amherst, unless you hate Berkeley) that will make you recognizable to people you may meet and befriend while living in one of these cities.
  1. Attending an elite college or university for undergrad does NOT guarantee that you’ll be admitted to an elite college or university for grad school.
Attending an elite school for undergrad does not give you a free pass in grad school admissions. Sure, it makes grad school admissions easier compared to the guy applying to grad school from University of Detroit or Frostburg State, but you still have to earn your spot in grad school, and you can’t just coast based on the prestige of your elite undergrad school.
For example, since all med schools are really selective (eg. <10% acceptance rate), most of my classmates from my Ivy in medical school attend places like Iowa, Rutgers, and Texas Tech. Did a couple get admitted to Harvard and Columbia? Sure, but only one or two. While these lesser ranked schools aren’t necessarily housed in prestigious universities, all of my classmates at these med schools are guaranteed to have stable, high-paying jobs for life, regardless of which one they attend. That is definitely an enviable position to be in, so they’re certainly doing very well for themselves.
For law school, graduating from an elite undergrad school definitely gives you a bit of a bump, but not a massive one. For example, if the median college GPA of admitted students at a law school that you’re applying to is a 3.9, then you’ll be competitive with a 3.8 or a 3.85 instead of a 3.9 by virtue of the fact that you went to an elite school. Suffice to say that it’s a bit of a bump, but not a massive one. However, by attending an elite school, you’ve likely gotten a lot of opportunities to polish the soft side of your application (eg. extracurriculars, recommendations, ect.) due to the sheer amount of resources available at elite schools. This soft part of your application will stand out more compared to applicants who didn’t attend elite schools. In general, I’d say more than three quarters of my classmates who applied to law school from my Ivy got accepted to T14 law schools. However, nearly one quarter didn’t, and several opted out of the application process altogether because they knew that they wouldn’t get into a T14 school.
Other grad programs elite college graduates regularly attend include business school, public policy/international affairs school, and PhDs. While attending elite colleges raises your chances slightly for admission to these elite grad schools, it does not guarantee that you’ll be admitted to Harvard Business School, Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School (public policy/international affairs), or Stanford’s PhD in Computer Science. Heck, attending an elite undergrad doesn’t 100% guarantee that you’ll get admitted to UT Austin’s MBA program or University of Washington’s Computer Science masters program.
This means that you can’t rest on your laurels. You still have to work hard and earn your spot at an elite grad school.
  1. If you’re burnt out from high school, take a gap year.
I really wish I had taken a gap year after high school. I went to a very competitive high school where lots of kids go to elite colleges and universities, and I was really burnt out when I showed up at college. While I did well academically my freshman year, I really believe that I would have benefitted from some time off.
For this reason, I’d highly recommend that you take a gap year if you’re burnt out. However, just because you’re taking a gap year doesn’t mean that you should be unproductive and do nothing. Instead, take some online courses, do a remote internship, or learn a foreign language. You won’t have many more opportunities in your life when you have several months without any commitments, so take advantage of that time to be with family and learn a new skill or hobby.
  1. If you want to learn a new foreign language, start taking classes in that foreign language the moment you arrive at your elite college.
If you always had a burning desire to learn Russian, Mandarin, Italian, Japanese, or any other language for that matter, but your high school didn’t offer classes in that language, guess what? Your elite college likely does and now is by far the best and easiest time in your life to learn that language. You will never again in your life have four years when you can consistently and easily devote yourself to learning a new foreign language. If you start a new language during your first semester freshman year and take a course in that language every single semester during your entire time in college (including a semester abroad with language immersion), I guarantee that you’ll reach at least intermediate proficiency in that foreign language by the time you graduate, even if that language is Russian or Mandarin.
  1. Elite colleges and universities only provide you with a limited set of (really good) careers options.
Oh boy, this is definitely a piece of information I wish I knew before attending my school. This information might be a bit of a downer for some, but attending an elite college or university will not open doors to every single career you’ve dreamed of. In general, elite universities feed people into five or six different careers through their career and grad school advising offices.
First, they’ll provide you opportunities to work on Wall Street (or other financial centers, such as Houston, San Francisco, Chicago, and Atlanta, depending on where your school is located) in investment banking. Investment bankers, or IBankers for short, usually work for large banks that were bailed out during the Great Recession, such as JP Morgan, Bank of America, and Goldman Sachs. IBankers help companies sell stock and bonds and revalue themselves after merging with other companies or selling off portions of their own company. That one sentence explanation is a vast oversimplification of IBanking, so keep that in mind. On a daily basis, IBankers create excel spreadsheets and powerpoint slides. They work crazy hours (eg. 60-70 hours per week, plus work on the weekends), but they also get paid a lot of money right out of college (eg. $100,000+ first year). If this appeals to you, check out Wall Street Oasis (WSO), which has by far the most resources and information for those who want to work on Wall Street. If this doesn’t sound appealing to you, there are a few other options to consider.
Elite universities also provide their students and graduates with jobs in management consulting. Management consultants work in teams of five to ten people and advise senior management (eg. CEOs, executive VPs, COOs, MDs, ect.) at large companies on the strategy and operations of their companies. Each week, consultants fly out to their client from the city they (the consultants) live in (eg. NYC, Boston, San Francisco, ect.). Usually, the client is located in pretty uneventful places like Spartanburg, South Carolina, so don’t get your hopes up about jetting over to Dubai or Miami and sipping martinis for the week. That’s not going to happen. Like IBankers, management consultants are glorified excel and powerpoint monkeys. Their hours are better than IBankers, and they usually do not have much weekend work. In order to land a consulting gig at a top firm (eg. McKinsey, Bain, and BCG, which are the Harvard, Yale, and Princeton of consulting), you’ll need to earn at least a 3.8 GPA or you’ll need to major in a hard STEM subject and pull above a 3.5 GPA. Otherwise, they probably won’t interview you even though you go to Williams, Harvard, or some other elite school. Still, you could land a consulting offer with a lower GPA at a less prestigious firm or a boutique firm, and you’ll have a pretty similar experience. In other words, your elite college will provide you opportunities in management consulting so long as your college GPA isn’t terrible. If you want to learn more about management consulting, check out Management Consulted and WSO’s forum on management consulting.
Elite schools also open up doors in the tech world. If you’re a whiz at computer science, you’ll have a strong shot at landing a software engineering job at Google, Facebook, Amazon, or another large tech company, provided that you can pass the coding interview. If you aren’t good enough to pass the coding interview at these places, rest assured as there are still plenty of other software job opportunities to choose from at less well known companies and startups, so you’ll graduate with a job making at least $70,000 and probably upwards of $100,000 if you play your cards right. Prestigious tech companies (eg. Apple) also have non-software jobs that your career services office at your elite school may enable you to recruit for. These positions are notoriously difficult to land because the barriers to entry are low (you don’t need technical skills), but you’ll at least have a better shot than most people at them because you attend an elite school.
Elite schools also help you win fellowships, such as Fulbrights and Teach for America. Your elite school likely has a fellowship office or a person in your career services office devoted to fellowships who can advise you. This advisor is typically not available at less prestigious institutions.
Elite schools also funnel students into professional graduate schools, especially law school and medical school. I’m not going to discuss either of these options here because I’ve already discussed both at length in another question above.
On the other hand, here is what elite schools do NOT provide career-wise. Elite schools do NOT provide special opportunities in politics on Capitol Hill or at the UN. They do NOT have a bunch of job postings in journalism at the NY Times or the Washington Post. They do NOT open tons of doors in entertainment and Hollywood. They do NOT offer tons of professional opportunities for musicians and artists. Sorry to burst your bubble, but attending Harvard or any other elite school isn’t going to get you a job at the UN, NY Times, Hollywood, or the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Career services won’t do jack for you if those are your career goals (except maybe help you land an unpaid internship). Instead, you’ll have to hustle on your own and network a ton to land those opportunities. It’s better for you to receive this tough love now than later on, even if it’s a bit of a downer to hear this.
Instead, maybe you always dreamed of being an English or History professor? Sorry to break it to you, but even if you’re talented enough to be a humanities professor (which you probably are) and even if you get into Harvard for your humanities PhD, the job market is so bad for humanities professors that you probably won’t get a job as a professor no matter how hard you try. The job market is marginally better for aspiring hard science and social science professors, but it’s still tough. If you really want to be a professor, go get a PhD in business after undergrad. While you probably won’t land a professorship at Harvard, there are tons of business professorships available at other schools, and you’ll almost certainly land one if you work hard. Again, sorry for the downer, but it’s better to be blunt and brutally honest than to lie to you and not tell you the truth.
  1. Be social and join extracurriculars once you arrive at your elite college or university, but don’t overextend yourself.
If you were shy and just studied a lot in high school, make sure you break out of your shell and be social once you arrive by joining and participating in a couple (more than one, but not 50+) extracurriculars and clubs on a very regular basis. If you feel social anxiety because you’re in a brand new place where half the kids were valedictorians or salutatorians at their high schools, don’t sweat it because your classmates are all feeling the same anxiety you’re feeling. My best advice to you is fake it ‘til you make it. Make sure to stand up straight, look your fellow classmates in the eyes, and smile. If you do those three things, you’ll be fine.
  1. Be aware of social hierarchies on campus and within your extracurriculars and clubs, but don’t be a social climber who spends their entire college life climbing these social hierarchies to the exclusion of everything else.
Once you arrive on campus, make sure you acquaint yourself with social hierarchies on campus and within your extracurriculars and clubs. For example, which clubs tend to be more popular? Which clubs are less mainstream (and frowned upon)? Ask yourself how people will perceive you if you join one club or another. Do some clubs feed into other clubs (eg. all members of the football team join one specific fraternity)? Who are the most influential people in the clubs you joined? How about the least influential?
At the same time, don’t be a shallow social climber who only cares about social status. People who only social climb end up miserable because they don’t form genuine friendships based on shared interests and values. Plus, social climbers don’t realize that at the end of four years once everyone graduates, the social hierarchy that existed on campus no longer matters at all as an alumnus or alumna of your elite college. Literally no one cares what sports team or fraternity or sorority you were in after you graduate. It sounds so “third grade” to talk about those things as alumni.
Nevertheless, make sure that you do not find yourself at the bottom of the social hierarchy while you’re in school (except initially WITHIN your extracurricular clubs where you’ll de facto have to start at the bottom as a new student and member in the club). You will definitely pay a big price socially while you’re in school if you’re at the bottom socially, and you will definitely be less happy. The good news is that it’s very easy to not be at the bottom. Just have your social antenna up, be socially aware, and don’t join unpopular clubs that have a strong social stigma on campus.
  1. Be strategic about the classes you take and the professors you choose.
In order to earn a high GPA, make sure you choose your classes and professors carefully. Some classes and professors are notorious for their harsh grading while others are much easier, and you should do everything you can to avoid the harder classes and professors. If you want to figure out which classes and professors are difficult, just ask an upperclassman majoring in a particular subject which ones they would avoid in their specific major.
Also, I’d highly recommend asking upperclassmen which classes and professors are the best. During fall semester, make it a point to ask five different upperclassmen which classes/professors were their favorite. Keep a list of these classes and professors and consider taking them if they align with your interests or distribution requirements.
  1. Take classes in your strongest subject areas during your first semester of freshman year.
Attending an elite college is a big bump up in terms of academic rigor compared to high school. If you take humanities and social science classes, you will have more reading than you’ve ever had before in an academic environment, and if you take science and math classes, you will have harder problem sets and exams than you’ve ever experienced in high school. As a first year student, you will likely be in class with some upperclassmen who have one, two, and three years of elite college academic experience under their belts. This means that they will likely be more skilled academically than the average freshman, and it will be harder, but certainly not impossible, for first year students like you to perform as well as they, especially in subject areas you know little about.
For this reason, I would highly recommend that you take classes in subject areas that you are really strong in during the first semester of your first year. If you were a US History buff in high school, then take an American history class. If you crushed it in AP French last year, then take French. If you’ve read tons of American literature, then take an American literature class. If you love stats, take a stats class.
  1. Don’t be a “know it all” or a “try hard” in class.
Don’t be the “know it all” who always raises their hand to answer every question in class. Don’t be the “try hard” who tries to demonstrate that they're smarter than everyone else. People who behave this way are off-putting and have toxic personal brands and bad reputations on all elite college campuses. Don’t be one of those guys.
On the other hand, do make an insightful comment (or two, or three, depending on the class) every class if you’re in a discussion-oriented class (then shut up). Do go to office hours and forge strong relationships with your professors. Do participate in study groups with other students. Do write good essays and perform well on midterms and final exams. Do your best academically and earn good grades.
  1. Invest time in dating.
Your four years at an elite college will be by far the easiest time to date during your entire life. You will be surrounded by hundreds to thousands of other smart, horny kids who are away from home for the first time and are keen to try new things. If you’re showing up to college as a virgin, guess what? So is the majority of your class, so you’re in good company, and there’s nothing to be embarrassed about.
If you’re confused or unclear about how to date, here are a couple simple tips that may be helpful whether you’re a guy or a girl. If you fancy someone in one of your classes or clubs, make sure you build a little rapport with them by engaging in small talk a couple times so they know who you are (which you’ve probably/hopefully done before/after class or during club activities). Remember to stand up straight, smile (not in a cheesy, contrived way), and look them in the eyes when you talk to them (and everyone else for that matter). Then, ask them casually to grab lunch (or coffee if students at your elite college grab coffee regularly) by saying something like, “Hey, let’s grab lunch some time!” Remember, in romance, especially if you’re a guy, never “ask” to do something; instead, suggest doing something by saying “Let’s do this” or “Let’s do that.”
If they say no, they’re probably not interested in you romantically even if they think you’re a good person, so don’t take it personally and instead move on to another person. Luckily, there are hundreds to thousands of other people that you can date at your elite school, so don’t worry. However, don’t ask out several people in one club or one class during the span of a week or two. You’ll come across as creepy if you do this.
If they say yes to lunch or coffee, you’ll probably exchange phone numbers with them and set up a time for lunch/coffee. You might even go to lunch together right then and there. After you grab lunch/coffee with them once or twice, study buddy with them if they’re in your class or collaborate together on a project for your club. Be somewhat subtle about your intentions at this point, but don’t be subtle for too long, which could put you in the friendzone.
Then, if things are going smoothly, and you sense that they’re also interested in you romantically (eg. they sit really closely to you, text you all the time about non-school related stuff, talk about sex/romance with you, hug you, and/or physically touch you in sexual or non-sexual places) study buddy or work together with them in a common area of your dorm once and/or invite them to a party. Then, if that goes well, invite them to work together in your room or bring them back to your room, and the two of you will probably end up making out and/or hooking up. Always make sure you have consent during this last step. From there, you can convert this encounter into a relationship and have a boyfriend or girlfriend if you would like.
Investing time in dating now while you’re at an elite college when it’s easy and accessible will make you more effective at dating later in life after college when you interact with many fewer people and dating is not as easy.
  1. Elite colleges don’t teach you how to network, but learning how to network is incredibly important.
Networking is an incredibly important skill that you won’t learn in your classes at an elite college. In order to excel personally, professionally, and socially as a student and graduate of an elite college, it’s essential that you take the time to learn how to network efficiently and effectively.
If you’re unsure where to start, here are a few simple tips that will help you become an effective networker. First, before you contact anyone, make a list of a few (two to four, not 10+) professional fields that you would like to work in. These might be finance, law, medicine, politics, or tech to name a few. Then, make a list of everyone you and your family know who either (a) lives in the city or location where you want to work and has a solid professional career in any field or (b) works in the field(s) you want to work in but lives in any location.
Once you have this list, contact all of these people (usually by email), tell them that you’re looking for career advice and ask them if they’d be willing to speak with you over the phone to give you advice. These phone calls are informally known as “informational interviews.” In most cases, assuming they know your family and you well, they will say yes to the phone call. However, if they don’t respond, send them a polite follow up email a week after you sent your first email, and if they don’t respond again, then don’t sweat it, move on, and speak to your other contacts on the phone.
Along with reaching out to people your family and you already know, you can also send “cold emails” to people you do not know who work in your desired fields. Before “cold emailing” random people, you should first reach out to graduates of your high school, graduates of your elite college, graduates of your elite college’s grad schools, and graduates of other colleges who were in your fraternity or sorority at other schools. Your elite college will have an alumni database that you can access; talk to advisors at your school’s career services office about acquiring this access. LinkedIn is also another great resource for tracking down alumni. Once you’ve exhausted these sources, you can “cold email” or “cold call” anyone in your desired field regardless of the school they attended. Since you may not have any connections to people you “cold email” or “cold call,” you may end up having a very low success rate in acquiring new contacts for your professional network using this method (eg. one out of ten “cold calls” may result in an actual connection). Nevertheless, with sufficient volume, “cold emailing” and “cold calling” can be very effective techniques for networking and are well worth the investment under the right circumstances.
Once you’re on the phone for an informational interview, start by asking your contact about their career (or instead about working in city X if they work in a different career field than your desired field but live in the city that you're targeting). After they’ve spoken for a bit about their career (or city), tell them that you’re interested in careers (and/or internships) in their field (or careers in field Y in their city) and ask them for advice. If they work in one of these fields, you may want to only say that you’re interested in careers in their field and avoid mentioning the other fields altogether, even if you’re also interested in those fields as well. Additionally, they will likely have lots of advice to give you. If they don’t work in one of your desired fields, they probably won’t have as much advice to give you.
Either way, ask them if they know anyone that works in your desired field(s) and your desired work location(s) and ask them if they would be willing to introduce you to these people. If they say yes (which they hopefully will), they’ll put you in touch with one or more of their contacts (usually via email) in your desired field(s) and location(s). Set up phone calls with their contacts, talk to them on the phone, ask for more contacts (especially if they don’t offer you an internship or a job), and repeat this process until you land a position. Send thank you emails to each person after every phone call and connect with each person you speak with on the phone on LinkedIn.
After each semester or every few months, send an email update to all of your contacts detailing anything new, RELEVANT, and/or interesting in your academic, extracurricular, and professional life (eg. classes you took, clubs you recently joined, internships you landed, awards you won, trips you took, ect.). When you send this email update to your contacts, do NOT add all of your contacts to one email message and send out one email message to everyone. Instead, send separate email messages to each contact and copy and paste the same text into each separate email message. While you’re networking, you may realize that some (or many) contacts you’ve made are not worth investing much time in, so you may choose to stop sending them email updates on a regular basis.
That’s networking in a nutshell. If you follow these steps starting freshman year, you’ll be way ahead of the pack compared to your peers.
  1. Get an internship during your freshman summer.
A surprisingly large number of students at elite colleges waste their freshman summers doing nothing because they don’t invest time in procuring a freshman summer internship. While finding a freshman summer internship can be difficult given that many large companies and organizations don’t typically hire freshmen for the summer, landing a freshman summer internship is certainly not impossible, especially since you attend an elite college, which will make hiring managers more likely to give you an offer.
Most freshman summer internships are unpaid. This means that you need to either (a) find an internship near your parents’ or relatives’ homes where you’ll get free housing and meals or (b) procure funding from family or other sources to cover the cost of living while you do your freshman summer internship in another city, such as NYC, DC, or SF. Elite colleges usually give grants to students doing unpaid public service internships, so you may be able to apply for funding from your school. Ask your career services office about funding options available at your school.
If you can't acquire funding for a freshman summer internship and/or you would prefer to live with family and relatives during your freshman summer, then you’ll probably have to network with alumni of your elite college that live in your local area, family friends, your high school teachers, and anyone else you know that lives in your local area to land a freshman summer internship. Use the networking strategies listed above, and you should be able to find something.
There are several local internship options near your home that are feasible to get for each career field. For politics, you can volunteer for a congressional campaign or work in the district office of your local Congressman. For law, you can reach out to local law firms and see if they’ll let you do some legal work during the summer. For tech, you can work for startups in your local area or remotely. For finance, you can contact wealth managers in your area and ask if they’ll let you intern during the summer. For medicine, you can contact doctor’s offices or hospitals and ask to shadow a doctor or nurse for a few weeks. Suffice to say there are lots of internship options for freshman summer, and it’s up to you to seize them.
  1. Find mentors.
While you're at your elite college, make sure you forge relationships with mentors. These mentors can include upperclassmen, professors, and alumni. Mentors will be able to advise you on all aspects of your life and will enable you to maximize your academic, personal, social, and professional success. By using the networking tips described above, you will develop strong relationships with a set of mentors who will be pivotal for your success
  1. Have fun!
Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, have fun! College is an amazing time wherever you end up going, so make sure as a student that you periodically put the books away and go to a frat party, floor party, and/or other social event(s). Never again in your life will it be deemed “okay” and “normal” to stay up into the wee hours of the morning drinking (or not drinking) and partying on a weekly basis. Take advantage of this time and have fun! Don’t get in trouble or break the law, but do make sure you do some memorable things so that you’ll have stories to tell and reminisce about when you hang out with your college buddies after you graduate.
Wherever you go to school, you’re going to have an awesome time. I sincerely mean that. Best of luck next year and as they say in theater, break a leg!
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Japanlife Coronavirus Megathread XI: JP + US Stimulus, Lockdown & International Mail Edition


Japan COVID-19 Tracker City level tracker Tokyo Metro. Gov. Tracker Tokyo tracker
Coronavirus Megathread I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X
The main body will be updated with mainly news and advisory from embassies. The thread will be re-created once it goes past roughly 1k comments or on moderators' request.
What you can do:
  1. Avoid travel to affected countries. You will not be able to return.
  2. Avoid going outdoors unless necessary. Less contact you have with people, the less chance you have to catch it or spread it. You might be an asymptomatic carrier. If you have to go out, wear a mask. Minimise eating out if possible and avoid going out to socialise. Avoid going to supermarkets during rush hour etc.
  3. Wash hands (with SOAP) frequently and observe strict hygiene regimen. Avoid touching your face and minimise touching random things (like door handles, train grab holds). Avoid hand-dryers.
  4. Avoid hoarding necessities such as toilet paper, masks, soap and food.
  5. Minimise travel on crowded public transportation if possible.
  6. If your employer has made accommodations for telework or working from home, please do it.
  7. If you show symptoms (cough, fever, shortness of breath and/or difficulty breathing) or suspect that you have contracted the virus, please call the coronavirus soudan hotline or your local hokenjo(保健所) here. They will advise you on what to do. Do not show up at a hospital or clinic unannounced, call ahead to let them know.
  8. Avoid spreading misinformation about the virus on social media.
News updates
Date
05/25 State of Emergency to be lifted nationwide
05/22 Government to consider letting foreign residents who are stuck overseas back into Japan
05/12 3 month extension granted for renewal of visas expiring in July.
05/03 Japan to ease curbs on social contact and let some facilities reopen
05/02 Special Cash Payments Online Application has been officially released by the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications
04/23 Japan Post stops accepting US-bound mail
04/17 100,000 yen handout should be ready by May: Aso Foreign residents included
04/04 WHO opens door to broader use of masks to limit spread of coronavirus
04/03 All foreigners(incl. PRs) will be denied entry if they have travel history to affected areas, MOJ See PDF for details
03/24 Olympic postponement of 1 year confirmed

ENTRY BAN RELATED INFORMATION:
Q&Afrom MHLW
japan.travel Travel restrictions info
(1) Bans on foreign Travelers Entering Japan if they have visited these places in last 14 days:
Continent Area
Asia Bangladesh, Brunei, China, India, Indonesia, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Maldives, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Viet Nam
Oceania Australia, New Zealand
North America Canada, United States of America
Latin America and the Caribbean Argentina, Antigua and Barbuda, Bahamas, Barbados, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Honduras, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Saint Christopher and Nevis, Uruguay
Europe Albania, Andorra, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Kyrgyz, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaco, Montenegro, Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Vatican
Middle East Afghanistan, Bahrain, Israel, Iran, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates
Africa Cabo Verde, Cote d’lvoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mauritius, Morocco, Sao Tome and Principe, South Africa
(2) Foreigners who have Chinese passports issued in Hubei Province or Zhejiang Province of China
(3) Foreigners who were on the cruise ship Westerdam, departed from Hong Kong
Information on travel restrictions for travelers from Japan (Japanese)

FAQ:
Can someone clarify whether these entry bans apply to permanent resident card holders?
Foreign language hotline for coronavirus soudan centre
Regarding how to get tested:
You can't get tested on demand. You will likely only be tested if you had direct contact with a known patient, have travel history to a hotspot, or are exhibiting severe symptoms. Only a doctor or coronavirus soudan centre has the discretion to decide if you are to be tested. **Testing criteria seems to be changing.
Useful links:
List of online grocers Is 100k stimulus taxable? (Japan / US) MHLW coronavirus aggregated info page
List of English-speaking mental health resources Why your package isn't arriving from USA / reaching USA MOJ data on foreigners with "exceptional circumstances"

submitted by zchew to japanlife [link] [comments]

Best of John Mayer Live World Tour 2019! UPDATE 4! ROUGH CUT VIDEO DEMO RELEASE! [I NEED YOUR HELP]

Hey guys! I'm back with another update! PLEASE DO GIVE SOME TIME AND READ THIS POST!AND Do Upvote this post so that all the JM Fans can know about this!! VERY VERY VERY IMPORTANT! I NEED YOUR HELP!
If you don't know what's this all about please do check these previous posts and you'll know everything there is to know:
UPDATE 2: https://www.reddit.com/JohnMayecomments/hgd3rh/best_of_john_mayer_live_world_tour_2019_update_2/
UPDATE 3: https://www.reddit.com/JohnMayecomments/hhzp8f/best_of_john_mayer_live_world_tour_2019_update_3/
To summarize... I'm making a live album (both audio and video) called "The Best of John Mayer's 2019 World Tour", which I'll be releasing soon on Reddit. I want to clarify right now that this all will be made available free for no charge.
I'm done with choosing/finalizing and editing the audios for album 3 and 4 whole. (and some songs for album 1 and 2 too).
album 3 = rarely performed original songs in the tour, album 4 = special, unreleased/cover songs or songs played with other artists on the tour. (To know more about the setlists and what's on what album - refer to the old posts linked above)
As I've mentioned in the posts before, to take this project to the next level, not only will the project have high-quality audio but the project will also have video, (MULTI-CAM Video!!!). We're going big this time.
First, let me show you a demo of how the final project will look like. This is not final. Just a rough cut to show you guys what I've been up to!! Do watch this video first and do read the whole post!!
The demo has: Love Is a Verb (Melbourne) and Covered in Rain (The Forum).
Audio for Love is a verb is from youtube and covered in rain is from archive.org.
Audio is pretty much final but the video is just a demo for you guys! Do critique the work in the comments!

ROUGH CUT VIDEO DEMO: https://youtu.be/eKQ5Gz2ArNg

So, now assuming you've watched the demo footage, you probably noticed the quality of the video. It's not that good but it's all I could find on Youtube. I had to work with what I had.
That's why I really need your help with the footage. Some songs don't have footages online and for some, more footage options would be awesome!
I want this project to be not any less than an official live album. So, I want a favor from you guys.If you had gone to the 2019 tour concert venues and have the songs that I have LISTED BELOW from SPECIFIC venues recorded (audio or video), then please go to this form linked below and fill in some required details and send me the videos ASAP!!!You can give me your name (name of the owner of the content) ... so that I'll be able to give full credit to everyone who submits the video. At the end of the project, I'll give credit to every video/audio I will have used.

FORM LINKS to send/upload videos (Any one) :

https://forms.gle/SU7ypTooUsD7PoME8

https://forms.gle/Xq3XpTvdUdh9roEC6

For now, these are the songs that I need! Only send the songs from the SPECIFIED venues!The audio and video clips should not necessarily be fully recorded.. even if you have a small clip please just send them.I've already gone through all the footage/audios on Youtube and archive.org but I really could use more clips and audio.Even if you've already posted the video on youtube please do send the ORIGINAL video to me. I'd like to minimize as much compression on the video as possible.Though high-quality video is recommended (At least 1080p), for now.. if you have any video ... please send them no matter the quality or the orientation (horizontal or vertical both works).And I'll choose from your submissions.
If you have large file sizes that the form won't accept or if you have any queries/ suggestions or any problem :
please contact me on Reddit or send me an email at : [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected]).You can even send the files in that email if it's too large.
***All of the performances listed below are sorted according to date and venue for easiness**\*
There are 2 lists. The first list is for videos (audio quality doesn't matter) and the other list is for audio-only (taped recordings not available online or high-quality recordings from phone).
List of FOOTAGES of songs that I need right now (AUDIO QUALITY DOESN'T Matter ... High Video Quality Recommended but do submit!!):
International:
Oceania:
How Great Thou Art (with Bella Kalolo) - Spark Arena, Auckland - March 23, 2019
Blues Run The Game > Queen of California - Spark Arena, Auckland - March 23, 2019
The Heart of Life - Spark Arena, Auckland - March 23, 2019
Belief - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019
Paper Doll > Knockin' on Heaven's Door (Bob Dylan) - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019
Free Fallin' - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019
Go Easy on Me - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019?
Love on the Weekend (with Intro) - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Love Is a Verb - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Clarity - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Neon - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Vultures (with Pino Bass Intro) - Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, Australia - March 29, 2019
Half of My Heart - Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, Australia - March 29, 2019
If I Ever Get Around to Living - Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, Australia - March 29, 2019
In Repair - Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, Australia - March 29, 2019

Asia:
Badge and Gun - Singapore Indoor Stadium, Singapore, Singapore - April 1, 2019
Heartbreak Warfare - Singapore Indoor Stadium, Singapore, Singapore - April 1, 2019
Covered in Rain > Neon - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019
Speak For Me - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019
Love on the Weekend (with Intro) - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019
Gravity - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019
Blues Run the Game > Queen of California - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 1 - April 10, 2019
Walt Grace's Submarine Test, January 1967 - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 1 - April 10, 2019
Belief (with Ed Sheeran) - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 1 - April 10, 2019 - (PREFERABLY CLOSE UP SHOTS)
Thinking out Loud (with Ed Sheeran) - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 1 - April 10, 2019 - (PREFERABLY CLOSE UP SHOTS)
Paper Doll - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 1 - April 10, 2019
Who Says > Waitin' on the Day - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 2 - April 11, 2019
Buckets of Rain (Bob Dylan) - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 2 - April 11, 2019
You're Gonna Live Forever In Me - Nippon Budokan, Tokyo, Japan - Night 2 - April 11, 2019

Europe:
A Face to Call Home - Ericsson Globe, Stockholm, Sweden - October 1, 2019
Go Easy on Me - Oslo Spektrum, Oslo, Norway - October 3, 2019
I'm Gonna Find Another You - Oslo Spektrum, Oslo, Norway - October 3, 2019
Come Back to Bed > Daughters - Jyske Bank Boxen, Herning, Denmark - October 7, 2019
Still Feel Like Your Man - Jyske Bank Boxen, Herning, Denmark - October 7, 2019
Roll it on Home - Jyske Bank Boxen, Herning, Denmark - October 7, 2019
A Face to Call Home - Ziggo Dome, Amsterdam, Netherlands - Night 1 - October 9, 2019
Gravity - Ziggo Dome, Amsterdam, Netherlands - Night 1 - October 9, 2019
Your Body is a Wonderland > Neon - Ziggo Dome, Amsterdam, Netherlands - Night 1 - October 9, 2019
Slow Dancing in a Burning Room - The O2 Arena, London - Night 1 - October 13, 2019
Happy Birthday to John!! - 3Arena, Dublin, Ireland - October 16, 2019
Tougher Than The Rest (Bruce Springsteen) - 3Arena, Dublin, Ireland - October 16, 2019
On The Way Home > Who Says - Manchester Arena, Manchester, England - October 18, 2019
Blues Run The Game > Queen of California - Manchester Arena, Manchester, England - October 18, 2019
Half of My Heart - Manchester Arena, Manchester, England - October 18, 2019

Canada:
Walt Grace's Submarine Test, January 1967 (with intro) - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Splitscreen Sadness - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Queen of California - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Vultures - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Wheel - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 2 - July 31, 2019

USA:
Belief - Times Union Center, Albany, NY - July 19, 2019
Wildfire - Times Union Center, Albany, NY - July 19, 2019
Something's Missing > In Your Atmosphere - Times Union Center, Albany, NY - July 19, 2019
Freebird Guy - Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, PA - July 22, 2019
Deal (Grateful Dead) - Madison Square Garden, New York, NY - Night 1 - July 25, 2019
The Heart of Life - Madison Square Garden, New York, NY - Night 2 - July 26, 2019
Stop This Train - Madison Square Garden, New York, NY - Night 2 - July 26, 2019?
Bold as Love - Madison Square Garden, New York, NY - Night 2 - July 26, 2019
Dreaming With a Broken Heart - Madison Square Garden, New York, NY - Night 2 - July 26, 2019
I'm Gonna Find Another You - Madison Square Garden, New York, NY - Night 2 - July 26, 2019
Vultures - PPG Paints Arena, Pittsburgh, PA - July 28, 2019
Speak For Me - Little Caesars Arena, Detroit, MI - August 2, 2019
XO - Little Caesars Arena, Detroit, MI - August 2, 2019
Friend of the Devil (Grateful Dead) - Little Caesars Arena, Detroit, MI - August 2, 2019
Let My Love Open The Door > The Age of Worry - Little Caesars Arena, Detroit, MI - August 2, 2019
Slow Dancing in a Burning Room - Value City Arena, Columbus, OH - August 3, 2019
I Just Remembered That I Didn't Care (with Chris Stapleton) - Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, TN - August 8, 2019 - (PREFERABLY CLOSE UP SHOTS)
Slow Dancing in a Burning Room (with Chris Stapleton) - Bridgestone Arena, Nashville, TN - August 8, 2019 - (PREFERABLY CLOSE UP SHOTS)
Ripple (Grateful Dead) - Spectrum Center, Charlotte, NC - August 9, 2019
Half of My Heart - State Farm Arena, Atlanta, GA - August 11, 2019
Still Be Loving You (David Ryan Harris) - State Farm Arena, Atlanta, GA - August 11, 2019
If I Ever Get Around To Living - Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Indianapolis, IN - August 12, 2019
Half of My Heart - United Center, Chicago, IL - Night 2 - August 15, 2019
Wheel - United Center, Chicago, IL - Night 1 - August 14, 2019
I'm on Fire > 3x5 - Sprint Center, Kansas City, MO - September 2, 2019
New Light - Sprint Center, Kansas City, MO - September 2, 2019
Clarity - Talking Stick Resort Arena, Phoenix, AZ - September 10, 2019
Covered in Rain - The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 1 - September 13, 2019
Daughters - The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 2 - September 14, 2019
Vultures - The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 2 - September 14, 2019
The Heart of Life - The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 2 - September 14, 2019
Stop This Train - The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 2 - September 14, 2019
Dreaming With a Broken Heart- The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 2 - September 14, 2019
Carry Me Away - The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 2 - September 14, 2019
New Light - The Forum, Inglewood, CA - Night 2 - September 14, 2019
Emoji of a Wave (with speech) - Chase Center, San Francisco, CA - September 16, 2019
Queen of California > Fire on the Mountain (with Bob Weir) - Chase Center, San Francisco, CA - September 16, 2019
Something Like Olivia (with Intro) - Chase Center, San Francisco, CA - September 16, 2019
Roll It on Home - Golden 1 Center, Sacramento, CA - September 17, 2019

List of AUDIO RECORDINGS(Good quality; maybe taped ones that are not on archive.org?) that I need (even bits and pieces will work):
International:
Oceania:
Blues Run The Game > Queen of California - Spark Arena, Auckland - March 23, 2019
The Heart of Life - Spark Arena, Auckland - March 23, 2019
Belief - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019
Paper Doll > Knockin' on Heaven's Door (Bob Dylan) - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019
Free Fallin' - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019?
Go Easy on Me - Brisbane Entertainment Centre, Brisbane, Australia - March 25, 2019
Love on the Weekend (with Intro) - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Love Is a Verb - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Clarity - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Neon - Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne, Australia - March 27, 2019
Half of My Heart - Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, Australia - March 29, 2019
If I Ever Get Around to Living - Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, Australia - March 29, 2019
In Repair - Qudos Bank Arena, Sydney, Australia - March 29, 2019

Asia:
Badge and Gun - Singapore Indoor Stadium, Singapore, Singapore - April 1, 2019
Heartbreak Warfare - Singapore Indoor Stadium, Singapore, Singapore - April 1, 2019
Covered in Rain > Neon - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019
Speak For Me - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019
Love on the Weekend (with Intro) - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019
Gravity - Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Wan Chai, Hong Kong - April 8, 2019

Europe:
A Face to Call Home - Ericsson Globe, Stockholm, Sweden - October 1, 2019
Go Easy on Me - Oslo Spektrum, Oslo, Norway - October 3, 2019
I'm Gonna Find Another You - Oslo Spektrum, Oslo, Norway - October 3, 2019
Come Back to Bed > Daughters - Jyske Bank Boxen, Herning, Denmark - October 7, 2019
Still Feel Like Your Man - Jyske Bank Boxen, Herning, Denmark - October 7, 2019
Roll it on Home - Jyske Bank Boxen, Herning, Denmark - October 7, 2019
A Face to Call Home - Ziggo Dome, Amsterdam, Netherlands - Night 1 - October 9, 2019
Gravity - Ziggo Dome, Amsterdam, Netherlands - Night 1 - October 9, 2019
Your Body is a Wonderland > Neon - Ziggo Dome, Amsterdam, Netherlands - Night 1 - October 9, 2019
Slow Dancing in a Burning Room - The O2 Arena, London - Night 1 - October 13, 2019
Tougher Than The Rest (Bruce Springsteen) - 3Arena, Dublin, Ireland - October 16, 2019
On The Way Home > Who Says - Manchester Arena, Manchester, England - October 18, 2019
Blues Run The Game > Queen of California - Manchester Arena, Manchester, England - October 18, 2019
Half of My Heart - Manchester Arena, Manchester, England - October 18, 2019

Canada:
Walt Grace's Submarine Test, January 1967 (with intro) - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Splitscreen Sadness - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Queen of California - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Vultures - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 1 - July 30, 2019
Wheel - Scotiabank Arena, Toronto, ON, Canada - Night 2 - July 31, 2019

USA:
Freebird Guy - Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, PA - July 22, 2019
Vultures - PPG Paints Arena, Pittsburgh, PA - July 28, 2019
Slow Dancing in a Burning Room - Value City Arena, Columbus, OH - August 3, 2019
Ripple (Grateful Dead) - Spectrum Center, Charlotte, NC - August 9, 2019
If I Ever Get Around To Living - Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Indianapolis, IN - August 12, 2019
Wheel - United Center, Chicago, IL - Night 1 - August 14, 2019
Half of My Heart - United Center, Chicago, IL - Night 2 - August 15, 2019
Clarity - Talking Stick Resort Arena, Phoenix, AZ - September 10, 2019
Emoji of a Wave - Chase Center, San Francisco, CA - September 16, 2019
Queen of California > Fire on the Mountain (with Bob Weir) - Chase Center, San Francisco, CA - September 16, 2019
Something Like Olivia (with Intro) - Chase Center, San Francisco, CA - September 16, 2019

Please Everyone if you have these then do send them ASAP! I want to finish and release the project as soon as possible!! Let's show the true power of the community!! In the end, this will not be just my project, it'll be our project!
If you are affiliated or own any Instagram John Mayer Fanpage then do contact me. I'm sure we can collaborate on this project. You can share the form there or something .. the Instagram community is pretty strong too!! Let's do this together!
Thank you so much for reading until the end! For now, do share this with fellow fans, friends, and family. The next update will come pretty soon!
Btw ... I'll be asking for submissions for other songs (Album 1 and 2) after completing album 3 and 4 completely. So, if the venues that you've gone to isn't on the list. Don't worry, you can help in the next submissions.
submitted by risforred12 to JohnMayer [link] [comments]

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